Germany has notoriously broad voidability laws. As a rule of thumb, any payment by a third party has high voidability risks if the third party has no obligation to make the payment under the contract. Such payments qualify as incongruent (3 months hardening period, very few further requirements) and often qualify as gratuitous (4 years hardening period, without any further requirements). A recent decision of the German High Court has stirred hope that the Court may give some leeway to cash pool payments by group companies. However, on a closer look at the decision, it becomes clear that the boundaries for an exemption from voidability were set very narrowly.

Comment on the German High Court decision dated 12. September 2019 (file no.: IX ZR 16/18) by Christine Borries, LL.M. (Sydney) and Dr. Markus Huber, lawyers of the German Hogan Lovells insolvency and restructuring practice.
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With thanks to Anton Korobeynikov of Sayenko Kharenko for his contribution to this article

On 25 September 2019, the Ukrainian Parliament brought into force law No. 112-IX (the “Law“). The purpose of the Law is to correct deficiencies in existing legislation and further promote out-of-court financial restructurings in the jurisdiction. The adoption of the Law comes in light of the high volume of non-performing loans which still exist in Ukraine.
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The development of new powertrain technology; challenges within established markets, such as diesel emissions issues; and falls in automotive production – production in the United Kingdom has fallen during the last 12 consecutive months – have all had a significant impact on the automotive and mobility industry.  The rapid increases in demand for connected, electric, and hybrid vehicles – together with the associated infrastructure – means that effective cooperation among OEMs, suppliers, regulators, and other stakeholders is now more important than ever. The cost of this new technology, aligned with shocks to production, such as the ongoing uncertainties around Brexit and China trade tariffs, means that more than ever, fortune will favor the innovative and the well prepared innovator.

Hogan Lovells partners Joe Bannister (UK), Heiko Tschauner (Germany), and Chris Donoho (U.S.) are part of the firm’s Business Restructuring and Insolvency practice. Bannister and his colleagues have a wealth of experience acting for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and suppliers in some of the most complex and intractable automotive cases of the past decade.  In this article they discuss the challenging issues that arise when an OEM is faced with a distressed supplier, and what can be done to mitigate the resultant risks.


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The Preventive Restructuring Frameworks Directive (EU) 2019/1023 is finally in force. Following its implementation into EU member states’ national law, the directive will hopefully prove an effective tool for Europe’s restructuring practitioners, just as the continent’s economic outlook darkens.
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The recent Debtwire European Mid-Market Forum opened with a presentation from Paul Johnson of the Institute of Fiscal Studies. He warned the delegates of storm clouds gathering over the economy, suggesting that we may begin to see an increasing number of distressed credits – perhaps not as significant as in the aftermath of the financial crisis, but that the general mood suggests an imminent turning of the credit cycle.

This was the backdrop to the “When direct lending turns distressed” panel, moderated by Mariana Valle of Debtwire, in which Hogan Lovells restructuring partner, Tom Astle took part. The other panellists were Steve Morris from Beechbrook Capital, Tristan Nagler from Aurelius Investments and Ciara O’Neill from DC Advisory.
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Recently the German legislature passed a new law, exempting extraordinary profits created by the waiver of claims under restructurings from income tax liability. The amendment was necessary because the German Federal Tax Court had previously held the original administrative decree (which in a conceptually different manner avoided the tax burden on such profits) unlawful. This article gives a brief overview over the legislative history and the practical consequences of the amendment.
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The Recast Insolvency Regulation 2015/848 governs cross-border insolvency proceedings within the European Union. It provides in particular for the opening of the main proceedings by the jurisdiction of the member state where the centre of the debtor’s main interests is located (presumed to be the place of its registered office) and the opening of one or more secondary proceedings in the member states where the debtor possesses an establishment.

In the case at hand, insolvency proceedings were opened in 2012 in Romania against Izoplac, its headquarters being in Romania. In 2014, Izoplac was placed under judicial liquidation in France upon the request of a creditor. The court set the insolvency date and the Public Prosecutor petitioned for a ban on managing against the manager for failing to file for insolvency within 45 days.
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The recently published report on the evaluation of the ESUG, the German law to facilitate the restructuring of companies, states that the changes introduced by the ESUG have been received positively overall, but that there is still room for improvement in many areas. Should the EU Restructuring Directive actually be adopted at the beginning of 2019, the legislator would have the opportunity to improve the ESUG legislation and implement the EU requirements for pre-insolvency restructuring proceedings in one bill. This would give the legislator the opportunity to further increase the global competitiveness of the German insolvency code and thereby strengthen the German market as such.
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Nearly a year ago, the Italian Parliament passed Law 155/2017 giving the Government twelve months to adopt a root and branch reform of the rules governing business distress and insolvency procedures, taking into account European legislation (EU Regulation 2015/848, Commission Recommendation 2014/135) and the principles of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law.  On 11 October 2018 the Italian Government issued the long-awaited draft of the legislative decree establishing the new Code for Distress and Insolvency (Codice della crisi d’impresa e dell’insovenza, the “New Code“).

The demise of insolvency?

At the heart of the New Code is the concept that the notion of “bankruptcy” (fallimento) is a thing of the past, to be replaced by “judicial liquidation” (liquidazione giudiziale), which becomes the last resort, available only when the debtor has failed to propose any other suitable solution. Seeking to ensure the best interest and satisfaction of creditors, the New Code prioritises procedures aimed at overcoming the crisis by keeping the business as a going concern (even if under new ownership).


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