In our previous blog post, we examined the decision of the New South Wales Court of Appeal to uphold the composition of classes of creditors in the Boart Longyear restructuring by way of scheme of arrangement.

Following an extensive second court hearing to approve the schemes of arrangement (which involved multiple days of hearings, several adjournments, and a court-ordered mediation), amended versions of the Boart Longyear schemes have now been approved by the Australian courts.

The decision emphasises the importance of the court’s overall “fairness” discretion in approving a scheme, irrespective of whether classes of creditors have been properly constituted. Importantly, differential treatment within a class of creditors that may not be sufficient to justify the creation of a separate class may nonetheless create sufficient unfairness to cause the scheme to ultimately fail. Significantly, the court was clear in its final judgment that the schemes as initially drafted would not have passed the “fairness” test and would have been rejected.

Continue Reading Update – Boart Longyear schemes of arrangement approved

Unitranche facilities have been a feature of the European and US markets for a number of years, and have recently been making their mark in Australia.

What is unitranche?  A unitranche facility is a single facility which replaces the need for separate senior and mezzanine facilities and carries a blended margin. It tends to be provided by a single lender on a take-and-hold basis.

Where has it come from? Unitranche began life around 2005 in the US mid-market, and spread into Europe in the wake of the global financial crisis in 2008. European banks were forced to de-lever their balance sheets post-2008, and also saw themselves subjected to more stringent capital adequacy requirements under Basel III. Non-bank lenders, the main providers of unitranche, are outside the reach of Basel III and, having initially taken the opportunity to fill that funding gap, have since seized a large share of the European mid-market.

In this article, we provide a brief introduction to unitranche, focus on the intercreditor issues which can arise when it is combined with a revolving credit facility, and look at how unitranche is evolving in Europe and may one day develop in Australia.

Continue Reading Unitranche: On the up, down under

In one of the most significant decisions relating to schemes of arrangement in Australia in recent years, the New South Wales Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal challenging the composition of classes of creditors in the Boart Longyear restructuring.

The decision significantly widens the extent to which creditors within the same voting class may be treated differently, both in terms of their existing rights and their rights under the proposed scheme. As a result, the decision may lead to greater flexibility for stakeholders and distressed companies seeking to devise restructuring plans via scheme of arrangement. Continue Reading New South Wales Court of Appeal upholds Boart Longyear scheme classes decision