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Just in time for Chinese New Year, a Hong Kong court has taken a major step forward in the developing law on cross-border insolvency by recognising a mainland Chinese liquidation for the first time. In Joint and Several Liquidators of CEFC Shanghai International Group Ltd [2020] HKCFI 167, Mr Justice Harris granted recognition and assistance to mainland administrators in Hong Kong so they could perform their functions and protect assets held in Hong Kong from enforcement.

He also declined to follow English precedent dating back more than a century by granting a stay on creditor proceedings in Hong Kong, reasoning that it was in line with modern thinking and practice in cross-border insolvency that a debtor’s assets should be distributed as part of a single proceeding, as per the pari passu principle.
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The Hong Kong Court of Appeal has suggested that a previous Court decision may have overstepped the mark by suggesting that an arbitration clause in a client agreement should generally take precedence over a creditor’s right to present a winding-up petition.

In But Ka Chon v Interactive Brokers LLC [2019] HKCA 873 (an otherwise fairly routine financial product misrepresentation case), Vice President of the Court of Appeal Madam Justice Kwan made obiter comments implying that the test previously set out by Harris J last year in Lasmos Limited v Southwest Pacific Bauxite (HK) Limited [2018] HKCFI 426, which followed recent English authority, appeared to be at odds with classical Hong Kong and Commonwealth authority whereby a winding-up petition may only be dismissed by establishing a bona fide defence on substantial grounds to the claim for the underlying debt.
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In 2016, the insolvency and bankruptcy landscape in India was radically overhauled by the introduction of the new Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (IBC). In addition to consolidating the complex set of existing laws and regulations on insolvency and bankruptcy into a single law, the IBC introduced time bound and creditor driven resolution process for distressed companies overseen by the newly formed National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT).

These changes were supported by amendments to the Banking Regulation Act to enable the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to force banks to file insolvency applications against defaulting borrowers under the IBC. Since the new law was enacted, more than 500 cases have been admitted by the NCLT with around 1000 applications pending. The restructuring and/or liquidation of these companies under the new system and the accompanying foreign investment reforms has opened up a number of opportunities through different avenues for foreign investors to invest in distressed Indian assets.  Continue reading for a summary of the principal avenues for foreign investment in India.


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On 8 February 2018, the Hong Kong Court of First Instance (the “Hong Kong Court“) ruled in Re Supreme Tycoon Limited [2018] HKCFI 277 that the common law power to recognise and assist foreign insolvency proceedings extends to voluntary liquidations. This is the first authority on this issue in Hong Kong.
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The Singapore Companies Act (Amendment) Act 2017 (the ”Act”) significantly overhauls Singapore’s corporate rescue and restructuring framework. In doing so, Singapore has adopted a number of key features from Chapter 11 of the US Bankruptcy Code.  This client alert highlights the main amendments of the Act that corporate debtors, lenders and distressed investors should be

The Singapore parliament recently passed a bill bringing in U.S. Chapter 11-inspired changes to its debt-restructuring framework, including provisions allowing (i) courts to approve financing with priority ahead of existing senior secured facilities; (ii) courts to approve a scheme even if there are dissenting creditor classes; and (iii) international assistance proceedings.

These provisions borrow heavily

Across Europe, increased regulation, governmental reforms, higher capital requirements and new accounting standards on valuing non-performing loans (“NPLs”) continue to drive sales of non-core loan assets, including NPLs. That background, coupled with the fact that many investors across Europe have raised capital in order to acquire loan portfolios which now needs to be deployed, is

Hogan Lovells’ U.S. Business Restructuring and Insolvency Practice head Chris Donoho and partner Ron Silverman, along with Jefferies’ Restructuring and Recapitalization Group co-head Richard Morgner, recently joined Debtwire legal analyst Richard Goldman to discuss current issues concerning cross-border restructurings.

During the discussion, the panel addressed the factors that prompt foreign-based companies to avail themselves of