Schemes of arrangement

A cross-practice team led by partner Tom Astle has advised a syndicate of c.75 lenders under a bespoke €1.06bn super priority loan to distressed Croatian food producing and retail giant Agrokor (the “SPFA“) on an English law scheme of arrangement proposed by the company. The scheme of arrangement was approved by 97.92% in number of the lenders under the SPFA, representing 99.99% in value of scheme claims, at the creditors’ meeting earlier this week, and was sanctioned by Mr Justice Fancourt this morning.

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In our previous blog post, we examined the decision of the New South Wales Court of Appeal to uphold the composition of classes of creditors in the Boart Longyear restructuring by way of scheme of arrangement.

Following an extensive second court hearing to approve the schemes of arrangement (which involved multiple days of hearings, several adjournments, and a court-ordered mediation), amended versions of the Boart Longyear schemes have now been approved by the Australian courts.

The decision emphasises the importance of the court’s overall “fairness” discretion in approving a scheme, irrespective of whether classes of creditors have been properly constituted. Importantly, differential treatment within a class of creditors that may not be sufficient to justify the creation of a separate class may nonetheless create sufficient unfairness to cause the scheme to ultimately fail. Significantly, the court was clear in its final judgment that the schemes as initially drafted would not have passed the “fairness” test and would have been rejected.


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This article first appeared in the Summer 2017 edition of Recovery Magazine and is published here with their kind permission.

The Companies Act scheme of arrangement – now set out in part 26 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006), has come a long way.  Long gone are the times when schemes of arrangement –

In one of the most significant decisions relating to schemes of arrangement in Australia in recent years, the New South Wales Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal challenging the composition of classes of creditors in the Boart Longyear restructuring.

The decision significantly widens the extent to which creditors within the same voting class may be treated differently, both in terms of their existing rights and their rights under the proposed scheme. As a result, the decision may lead to greater flexibility for stakeholders and distressed companies seeking to devise restructuring plans via scheme of arrangement.
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