The Singapore Companies Act (Amendment) Act 2017 (the ”Act”) significantly overhauls Singapore’s corporate rescue and restructuring framework. In doing so, Singapore has adopted a number of key features from Chapter 11 of the US Bankruptcy Code.  This client alert highlights the main amendments of the Act that corporate debtors, lenders and distressed investors should be

In one of the most significant decisions relating to schemes of arrangement in Australia in recent years, the New South Wales Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal challenging the composition of classes of creditors in the Boart Longyear restructuring.

The decision significantly widens the extent to which creditors within the same voting class may be treated differently, both in terms of their existing rights and their rights under the proposed scheme. As a result, the decision may lead to greater flexibility for stakeholders and distressed companies seeking to devise restructuring plans via scheme of arrangement.
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The Singapore parliament recently passed a bill bringing in U.S. Chapter 11-inspired changes to its debt-restructuring framework, including provisions allowing (i) courts to approve financing with priority ahead of existing senior secured facilities; (ii) courts to approve a scheme even if there are dissenting creditor classes; and (iii) international assistance proceedings.

These provisions borrow heavily

In seiner lange erwarteten Entscheidung zur Verfassungsmäßigkeit von § 8c KStG, der Vorschrift zum Verlustuntergang bei Beteiligungswechseln, hat das Bundesverfassungsgericht (“BVerfG”) am 29. März 2017 eine Entscheidung getroffen (2 BvL 6/11), die jetzt bekannt gemacht wurde. Das BVerfG hält § 8c Abs. 1 Satz 1 KStG für verfassungswidrig.


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Hogan Lovells’ U.S. Business Restructuring and Insolvency Practice head Chris Donoho and partner Ron Silverman, along with Jefferies’ Restructuring and Recapitalization Group co-head Richard Morgner, recently joined Debtwire legal analyst Richard Goldman to discuss current issues concerning cross-border restructurings.

During the discussion, the panel addressed the factors that prompt foreign-based companies to avail themselves of

Over the past several years, the international financial community has witnessed a significant increase in cross-border restructurings of Chinese companies. These restructurings have involved large enterprises with billions of dollars of revenues and indebtedness. The increase in cross-border financings, and therefore restructurings, is tied to the huge debts that Chinese companies, banks and municipalities have been accumulating since the financial crisis of 2008-2009. As central banks have held interest rates at record lows and bought up government debt to stabilize the financial system, investors have increasingly turned to corporate debt issued in emerging markets as a source of higher returns. Chinese companies have capitalized on this appetite for foreign investment and have borrowed $377bn from 2010 to 2014, according to the Bank for International Settlements.

A new wave of foreign investment seems just over the horizon. A regulatory shift was promulgated by the People’s Republic of China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) circular on administration and filing of foreign debt, which came into effect on 14 September 2015. The NDRC rule is just the most recent in a series of changes that China’s regime has gone through over the last two years that facilitate cross-border Chinese financing and investment.


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