We have advised the Single Resolution Board, the banking resolution authority of the Eurozone, with respect to the two Italian banks Banca Popolare di Vicenza S.p.A. and Veneto Banca S.p.A.

Following the decision taken by the European Central Bank on 23 June 2017 to declare Banca Popolare di Vicenza S.p.A. and Veneto Banca S.p.A. as ‘failing or likely to fail’, the Single Resolution Board has decided that resolution action by the Single Resolution Board is not warranted for these banks. As a consequence, the winding up of the banks will take place under national Italian proceedings. With the approval of the European Commission the Italian government has subsequently decided to grant aid to facilitate the liquidation of Banca Popolare di Vicenza S.p.A. and Veneto Banca S.p.A. under national Italian insolvency law.

The Single Resolution Board has been supported in this process by a cross-border team of Hogan Lovells supervised by the Frankfurt based partner Dr. Tim Oliver Brandi and Italian Partners Jeffrey Greenbaum, Luca Picone, Francesco Stella, Federico Del Monte, Fulvia Astolfi,  Filippo Chiaves and Vittorio Moresco.

 

On 13 July 2017 the High Court gave its judgment in UBS AG, London Branch v. GLAS Trust Corporation Limited [2017] EWHC 1788 (Comm), a case brought by UBS against the trustee for notes issued as part of a securitisation transaction by Fairhold Securitisation Limited (the “Issuer“). UBS disputed the ability of the trustee to absorb costs incurred by a group of noteholders pursuing a potential restructuring of the debt. The case will be of interest to trustees, investors and other stakeholders involved in the restructuring of finance transactions involving a trustee. The case provides some useful guidance on the test to be applied in determining whether expenses of a trustee have been “properly incurred“. Continue Reading Paying for a debt restructuring – can costs be adopted by the Trustee?

Der Wert der Insolvenzmasse ist Berechnungsgrundlage sowohl für die Vergütung des Insolvenzverwalters als auch die Gerichtsgebühr im Insolvenzverfahren. Obwohl die Regelungen hierzu gleich lauten, legt sie das OLG München unterschiedlich aus. Die Folge im aktuellen Fall ist eine knapp sechsfach höhere Bemessungsgrundlage zugunsten der Gerichtskasse. Die Mehrheit der Oberlandesgerichte teilt diese Sichtweise nicht. Damit begründet die Rechtsprechung des OLG München einen deutlichen Standortnachteil für Betriebsfortführungen im Insolvenzverfahren im Bezirk des Oberlandesgerichts München. Diese Rechtsprechung kann weiter gedacht dazu führen, dass der Verwalter bei einem margenschwachen Geschäft den Betrieb einstellen muss, um nicht durch die Begründung hoher Gerichtskosten die Bezahlung der sonstigen Masseverbindlichkeiten zu gefährden.

Continue Reading Gerichtsgebühren im Insolvenzverfahren: Standortnachteil München?

In order to promote a “rescue culture”, the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 – better known as TUPE –  says that where the transferring business is the subject of bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings instituted “with a view to the liquidation of the assets of the transferor”, the employees will not transfer and any dismissals connected with the transfer are not automatically unfair.

The wording of this insolvency exemption is contained in the European Acquired Rights Directive from which TUPE is derived. In Federatie Nederlandse Vakvereniging v Smallsteps BV the European Court was asked to decide if a pre-pack sale – designed to prepare the business transfer in advance so as to allow a swift re-launch once the insolvency had been declared – fell within this exemption.  The decision was published on 22 June, click here to read our note on the case.

Considerations when Changing the Trustee on a Debt Transaction

In recent times there has been an increase in instances of trustees being changed on debt deals. As this phenomenon becomes more widespread, we look at some of the issues and processes that need to be taken into account when issuers, investors or trustees themselves are considering making a change. Continue reading

On 9 March 2017, Hogan Lovells hosted a panel discussion looking at the opportunities and challenges involved in direct lending in Italy. The speakers included experts with knowledge of the Italian market, who put forward their thoughts and shared their own recent practical experiences of doing deals in Italy.  This article – Direct lending in Italy – provides a summary of what was discussed in the session as well as some further background on the market.

 

In seiner lange erwarteten Entscheidung zur Verfassungsmäßigkeit von § 8c KStG, der Vorschrift zum Verlustuntergang bei Beteiligungswechseln, hat das Bundesverfassungsgericht (“BVerfG”) am 29. März 2017 eine Entscheidung getroffen (2 BvL 6/11), die jetzt bekannt gemacht wurde. Das BVerfG hält § 8c Abs. 1 Satz 1 KStG für verfassungswidrig.

Continue Reading Totgesagte leben langer – Steuerverluste ab 2008 doch nicht verloren

Across Europe, increased regulation, governmental reforms, higher capital requirements and new accounting standards on valuing non-performing loans (“NPLs”) continue to drive sales of non-core loan assets, including NPLs. That background, coupled with the fact that many investors across Europe have raised capital in order to acquire loan portfolios which now needs to be deployed, is likely to drive further transactions (as well as those in new markets and in relation to more complex asset classes).

The last half of 2016 saw considerable activity in Southern Europe in particular which is likely to continue in 2017 and spread to other jurisdictions in Europe. Equally, the rising trend in NPLs in South-East Asia indicates that deleveraging is likely to become more prevalent there as well in the short to medium term.

Our cross-group team has taken an in depth look at the market, brought together in a report on loan portfolio transactions and their related financings. The report highlights potential structuring and execution techniques and explains key initial considerations for potential investors in a number of key jurisdictions.  Click here for our Client note on loan portfolio transactions or alternatively click here to go to our interactive microsite where you can view country-specific analysis for the jurisdictions covered in our report.

Over the past several years, the international financial community has witnessed a significant increase in cross-border restructurings of Chinese companies. These restructurings have involved large enterprises with billions of dollars of revenues and indebtedness. The increase in cross-border financings, and therefore restructurings, is tied to the huge debts that Chinese companies, banks and municipalities have been accumulating since the financial crisis of 2008-2009. As central banks have held interest rates at record lows and bought up government debt to stabilize the financial system, investors have increasingly turned to corporate debt issued in emerging markets as a source of higher returns. Chinese companies have capitalized on this appetite for foreign investment and have borrowed $377bn from 2010 to 2014, according to the Bank for International Settlements.

A new wave of foreign investment seems just over the horizon. A regulatory shift was promulgated by the People’s Republic of China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) circular on administration and filing of foreign debt, which came into effect on 14 September 2015. The NDRC rule is just the most recent in a series of changes that China’s regime has gone through over the last two years that facilitate cross-border Chinese financing and investment.

Continue Reading Restructuring foreign investments in Chinese companies

On 20 March 2017, the European Central Bank (ECB) published final guidance to banks on non-performing loans (NPLs).  Although the NPL guidance is non-binding in nature, banks should be able to explain and substantiate any deviations on supervisory request. The guidance will also be taken into consideration in the SSM supervisory review and evaluation process and non-compliance may trigger supervisory measures.

The thrust of the guidance is that banks must develop, implement and maintain a strategy for dealing with NPLs, including setting “realistic but ambitious” NPL reduction targets, establishing separate NPL work-out teams and requiring regular valuations of collateral. The guidance also looks at the use of forbearance options (such as reducing the interest rate or extending the repayment date) and how to measure impairment and write-offs in line with international accounting standards.

Continue Reading ECB publishes final guidance on dealing with NPLs