Unitranche facilities have been a feature of the European and US markets for a number of years, and have recently been making their mark in Australia.

What is unitranche?  A unitranche facility is a single facility which replaces the need for separate senior and mezzanine facilities and carries a blended margin. It tends to be provided by a single lender on a take-and-hold basis.

Where has it come from? Unitranche began life around 2005 in the US mid-market, and spread into Europe in the wake of the global financial crisis in 2008. European banks were forced to de-lever their balance sheets post-2008, and also saw themselves subjected to more stringent capital adequacy requirements under Basel III. Non-bank lenders, the main providers of unitranche, are outside the reach of Basel III and, having initially taken the opportunity to fill that funding gap, have since seized a large share of the European mid-market.

In this article, we provide a brief introduction to unitranche, focus on the intercreditor issues which can arise when it is combined with a revolving credit facility, and look at how unitranche is evolving in Europe and may one day develop in Australia.

Continue Reading Unitranche: On the up, down under

What if anything is different?
This article by Joe Bannister previously appeared in Oil & Gas Financial Journal on 16 May 2016, click here to go the original article.
NO ONE with any interest in or knowledge of the oil and gas industry can deny that the present market conditions are anything other than challenging. However, oil price volatility and the problems it creates at the pumps, on the rigs, and in the markets is nothing new. Dependent upon one’s age and perspective, the present turmoil is merely another example of the sort of disruption and havoc played on corporate and personal budgets by the 1970 energy crisis and its aftermath. From the mid-1980s to September 2003, the inflation adjusted price of a barrel of crude oil was generally less than US$25 per barrel.  Continue reading